Dew – a haiku

After my prior failed attempt to write a haiku, I gathered some courage to give it another go. Do share what you all think of it!

Dew drop on the grass.
When gazed, lying by its side –
fortune-telling ball.

P.S. For those who don’t know, I am learning Russian and therefore tried to write this haiku in Russian. I could only get the first line done, but all in good time.


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Β© Dew – a haiku by Neha Sharma is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

81 thoughts on “Dew – a haiku

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  1. I was at the begining
    all days and years
    start from me

    1 january in Bulgaria is the day of the name Vasil😊
    Original 5-7-5 haiku in Bulgarian

    Бях Π² Π½Π°Ρ‡Π°Π»ΠΎΡ‚ΠΎ
    всички Π΄Π½ΠΈ ΠΈ Π³ΠΎΠ΄ΠΈΠ½ΠΈ
    Π·Π°ΠΏΠΎΡ‡Π²Π°Ρ‚ ΠΎΡ‚ ΠΌΠ΅Π½

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am still learning Russian, so Bulgarian is still a couple years away from me πŸ˜€

      However, I absolutely love the English version of your haiku. This also relates to the concept of time in Hinduism, so it got me feeling all spiritual for a moment πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I don’t know very much about haiku, so I can only say you have written a thoughtful and intriguing view of the dew drop. You probably know there is a debate about whether punctuation is necessary. Just for fun I looked up my first haiku (I have only written 2 in my life, I think) and I found a very interesting comment there from an award wining haiku writer in NZ, mentioning why the 5, 7, 5 is not essential for haiku in English. (You may know that, too.) Look for Sandra’s comment. https://silkannthreades.wordpress.com/2014/01/25/4021/#comments. Hope you finish the Russian version and you keep mastering the art of haiku.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for this comment! God knows how much I needed this info. I knew that there are both strict-form haikus and free-form haikus but I had no clue about the sound-units concept of Japanese. So glad to have read about it now πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Haiku can create a special world of its own, as yours does. I used to write some years ago. Recently I am following a poet who writes wonderful haikus but her poems often don’t stick to the formal syllable count. I researched a bit and apparently in some schools of thought now, it isn’t considered necessary. Its more of feeling. If I write one again, I’ll go for 17 syllables.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You’ve got the craft Neha πŸ™‚ Do keep trying. Practise does make one perfect. I also did my stint at learning Russian and I do understand how difficult it can be to get a perfect haiku in Russian. I hope to nail it! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Sure πŸ™‚ I’ve completed only a certificate course so I’m not much experienced. I get confused abt the meanings but the inflections are kinda easy to learn if you’ve learnt Sanskrit (which I luckily had!). At the best I can read n write. The problem is with proper sentence construction coz there are ever so many rules! πŸ™‚ I believe you do better than me πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

          1. Actually, I did Certificate course in Russian as an elective subject for my postgraduation. We had a textbook which was pretty simple and really useful. I don’t have it with me at the moment. But if u will, I’ll text u its details by today evening πŸ™‚

            Liked by 1 person

  5. My first posted Haiku had 5-7-4 syllables, but it was intentional lol. There are definitely traditionalists, and I follow very few of their rules (I rarely write about nature, my second line rarely serves the first and last both, for example), but I love how the constraints can squeeze out such poignancy. I think I’ve said more in some of my Haikus than I’ve said in much longer pieces. This was excellent, though. I’m enjoying your work. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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